Shared Ownership – How Property Price Changes Affect Your Investment

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 As property prices fluctuate, it is essential to understand how these changes can affect shared ownership. In this article, we will explore the implications of increasing and decreasing property values on shared ownership using two example scenarios.

Shared ownership is a popular option for first-time homebuyers in the UK, as it offers an affordable means of getting onto the property ladder. With shared ownership, a buyer typically purchases a percentage of a property and pays rent on the remaining share, which is owned by a housing association.

Increasing Property Value and Its Effects on Shared Ownership

When property prices rise, shared ownership can become more advantageous for the buyer. In our first example, Jane purchased a 75% share in a property with an initial value of £300,000. As the property’s value increased to £325,000, Jane’s share appreciated by £18,750. If Jane decides to sell her share or staircase to a higher percentage of ownership, she can benefit from this appreciation in value.

In this scenario, the housing association’s 25% share also increased in value. If Jane wishes to purchase additional shares, she would have to pay the current market value for those shares. This means that staircasing in a rising market can become more expensive, but it also allows Jane to further benefit from the increasing property value.

Decreasing Property Value and Its Effects on Shared Ownership

A decline in property prices can have different implications for shared ownership. In our second example, John purchased a 75% share in a property initially worth £300,000. Over time, the property’s value decreased to £275,000, resulting in a £18,750 depreciation in the value of John’s share. If John decides to sell his share or staircase to a higher percentage of ownership, he may face a loss due to this decrease in value.

However, the housing association’s 25% share also decreased in value. This means that if John wishes to purchase additional shares, he would pay the current market value, which is lower than the initial price. This can present an opportunity for John to increase his ownership percentage at a lower cost, potentially recouping losses if the property value increases in the future.

Conclusion

Changes in property prices can have varying effects on shared ownership.

Scenario

Initial Property Value

New Property Value

Share Purchased

Initial Share Value

New Share Value

Value Change

Cost of Additional 5% Share

Increasing Value

£300,000

£325,000

75%

£225,000

£243,750

+£18,750

£16,250

Decreasing Value

£300,000

£275,000

75%

£225,000

£206,250

-£18,750

£13,750

In the “Increasing Value” scenario, Jane benefits from the appreciation of her share and faces a higher cost for an additional 5% share due to the increased property value. In contrast, the “Decreasing Value” scenario shows that John faces a loss in his share value, but he can purchase an additional 5% share at a lower cost due to the decreased property value.

An increase in property value can lead to appreciation of the buyer’s share and potential profits when selling or staircasing. Conversely, a decrease in property value can result in a potential loss for the buyer, but may also present an opportunity to purchase additional shares at a lower cost. It is crucial for individuals considering shared ownership to remain aware of market fluctuations and their potential impact on their investment.

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